Minimally invasive, maximum quality

Gynecology program named Center of Excellence

By April Frawley Birdwell

The minimally invasive gynecological surgery service within UF&Shands, the University of Florida Academic Health Center, has been named a Center of Excellence in Minimally Invasive Gynecology, a field focused on reducing complications and speeding up recovery times following surgery.

Housed within the UF College of Medicine department of obstetrics and gynecology, the new Center of Excellence received the designation from the American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists, or AAGL, in October. To receive the distinction, centers must display commitment to the field, as demonstrated by a high surgical volume, adherence to safety standards, low complication rates and a consistent surgical team under the direction of board-certified surgeons trained in minimally invasive gynecologic surgery.

Minimally invasive surgery makes use of tools and techniques such as laparoscopy, hysteroscopy and robotic surgery to perform surgical procedures with smaller incisions or no incisions, which typically translates to less pain and quicker recoveries for patients.

“We want to make sure we do what is best for our patients and that they are aware of all their options,” said Nash Moawad, M.D., M.S., an assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology, head of minimally invasive gynecologic surgery in the UF College of Medicine and director of the new Center of Excellence. “Historically, most surgeries were performed through large incisions, but through significant strides in specialized training, science and technology over the past two decades, almost all gynecologic surgeries can now be performed through a minimally invasive approach. In spite of this, over half of hysterectomies in the community are still performed through large incisions, so we strongly advocate patient education and awareness of their options and we empower women to ask questions and seek the least invasive solutions for their gynecologic problems.”

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